Azithromycin substitute

Posted: Feonarus On: 21-Feb-2019
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Azithromycin is an antibiotic prescribed to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who develop respiratory infections. CF is an inherited, life-threatening disease caused by a defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which results in the abnormal function of organs such as the lungs and pancreas, excessive production of thick and sticky mucus, as well as a higher propensity to develop respiratory infections. The antibiotic is currently commercialized in the United States under the brand names Zithromax and Zmax, and it comes in the form of a tablet, an extended-release long-acting liquid, and a liquid taken orally. Depending on the purpose of the treatment, azithromycin may be take once a day or once a week, according to a physician’s treatment plan. Pfizer currently commercializes azithromycin in the United States, after the first approval of the product by the end of the 1990s. Backed by clinical trials that confirmed that prophylaxis with once-weekly Zithromax reduced the risk of developing complex (MAC) bacteria in the bloodstream and the clinical signs and symptoms associated with it, the U. FDA approved the commercialization of the antibiotic in 1996. Zithromax TRI-PAK (azithromycin) tablets reached the market in 2002, and Zmax (azithromycin) Extended Release Oral Suspension in 2005. Such as erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin have been used widely to combat primarily respiratory diseases caused by Gram-positive pathogens and fastidious Gram-negative pathogens. The popularity of this class of antibiotics is largely due to their spectrum of activity and their relative safety. The second-generation macrolides, clarithromycin and azithromycin, are derived from erythromycin, and have a broader spectrum of activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties. inhibit bacterial protein synthesis by interfering with ribosome function, and details of the inhibitory mechanisms have been clarified by recent advances in the x-ray structure of the ribosome–macrolide complexes. The widespread use of these antibiotics had catalyzed the emergence of macrolide-resistant strains, especially among . In response to these resistant pathogens, third-generation macrolides, represented by the ketolide telithromycin, are being developed. These derivatives have increased affinity for the bacterial ribosome and a reduced propensity to be efflux pump substrates compared with the first- and second-generation macrolides.

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MSU @michiganstateu Twitter

The latest Tweets from MSU @michiganstateu. The official Twitter account for Michigan State University. #SpartansWill. East Lansing, MI USA Name Brand Names Class Intro- duced Bacteri- ostaic * Bacteri- cidal ** Intracellular Penetration CNS Penetration Half-Life *** TBD applications Adverse Effects

Azithromycin substitute
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